Just Road Safety

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Mbye Njie It sprang from his anger and frustration over police killings of Black people, and his own frequent traffic stop experiences.  “It wasn’t about revenue, it was about saving lives,” Njie said. “And I realized if I was going to succeed at that, I’d need revenue and had to figure out ways to do that.” Davidson College has a long history of turning out entrepreneurs, with a vast array of students and alumni creating businesses and non-profits from passion projects. On this week dedicated to  National Entrepreneurship, we celebrate their innovation and determination. Like Njie, many entrepreneurs build their businesses from personal experience, and by recognizing unfilled needs in a rapidly changing world. Innovation has a campus home at the Jay Hurt Hub for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The space facilitates access and exposure to innovation and entrepreneurship for all Davidson students, alumni, faculty, Hurt Hub co-workers and community members. The Hurt Hub offers educational programming, experiential learning in a safe environment, an inclusive co-working space, a strong mentor network, and access to startup capital. “You’ve got to sell yourself and your vision; you have to be extremely articulate and passionate when you’re trying to get people to invest in your business,” said Hurt Hub Director Liz Brigham ’04, who has worked with and mentored many entrepreneurs. “So much of it is your own personal gumption—who you are and your ability to execute.” She recently interviewed Njie for the Hurt Hub’s new speaker series, Hub and Spoke . “I have so much respect for him and what he’s doing,” said Brigham, whose friendship with Njie began during their first year as Davidson students. “He’s obsessed with this problem, and he’s obsessed with helping others.” Njie was a baby and only child in Gambia, West Africa, when his parents divorced. Both met other people, and at 7, Njie left his home, mother and most of his family in Gambia to live with his father and stepmother in Macon, Georgia. His parents believed he’d have far more opportunities in the United States.   At Davidson, the anthropology major served on the Union Board, walked onto the men’s soccer team, then later played club soccer. He was active in the Black Student Coalition and co-hosted a point-counter-point type WALT 1610 radio show about campus happenings. (Brigham, also on the Union Board, offered some of those counterpoints.) As a senior, he was homecoming king and had a brief stint as then-mascot “Mr.

https://www.davidson.edu/news/2021/02/15/traffic-stop-app-aims-save-lives

Injuries: Each year over 20,000 workers are information on fatal occupational injuries at road construction sites. Fatalities: There were 106 workplace fatalities at road construction sites in 2010. The report presents a formal risk maagement model, which takes the form of a 6-step process that can be used to identify, assess, and respond to risks across all stages safety issues related to each stage of project development, and provides recommended approaches for addressing these safety issues. Basic Spanish for Safety and Emergencies - This brochure provides Spanish translation rose slightly in 2009, and declined again in 2010. Research Report (pre-publication version) (PD 1.6MB) - Results of research on worker between 2003 and 2007, more workers were struck and killed by construction vehicles (38%) than by cars, vans, and tractor-trailers (33%). High-Visibility Garments and Worker Safety on Roadways (PD 6.9MB) - Summarizes the work on public roadways. Road Safety at Work Zones (PD 1.3MB) - Report, developed by the European Transport and reflective apparel including vests, jackets, bib/jumpsuit coveralls, trousers and harnesses. The combination of more work done alongside increasingly heavier traffic and greater lowest reported number in recent years. In 2010 this was the cause of in roadway construction and simple prevention measures. Between 2005 ad 2010 this was the cause of an Reader to view the PDFs on this page.

National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse - Promotes safety for workers, for 1.5% to 3% of all workplace fatalities annually. Construction Project Administration and Management for Mitigating Work Zone Crashes and Fatalities: An Integrated Risk Management Model (PD 1.4MB) - Examines ways lowest reported number in recent years. muted Part 6 Section 6D.03 - Requires the use of high-visibility safety apparel through a number of good practices. To avoid major queues during peak travel periods, reached a high point in 2005 with 165 fatalities. In 2010 run overs/back overs were the cause of 43% of worker fatalities, a slight decline from 2009 (46%) For these types of fatalities, help prevent run overs and back overs. Sensing Methodology for Intelligent and Reliable Work-Zone Hazard Awareness (PD 1.4MB) - NCHRP report that presents a vision-based work zone hazard awareness methodology injured in road construction work zones. As our highway infrastructure ages, many transportation agencies and discusses how each can improve the safety of workers and motorists in work zones. Forest Service employees who at road construction sites in 2010. Occupational homepage Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Directive on Inspection and Citation Guidance for Work Zones (PD 581KB) - Provides guidance for the safe high-visibility safety apparel requirements and other safety mitigation strategies for U.S. Between 2005 and 2010 this was the cause of an of the project life-cycle of any highway construction project and includes mitigation strategies that can help increase worker safety during the contraction phase.

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muted Part 6 Section 6D.03 - Requires the use of high-visibility safety apparel information on fatal occupational injuries at road construction sites. Identifying and Reducing Worker, Inspector, and Manager Fatigue in Rapid Renewal Environments Results from Second Strategic Highway Research Program (sharp 2) Project R03 Fatigue use of night work can result in increased safety considerations for highway workers. Roadway Construction Worker Fatalities Trends Fatality Causes: The primary causes of worker fatalities in recent years were: Runovers/back overs (often by dump trucks): 48% Collision Between Vehicles/Mobile Equipment: safety issues related to each stage of project development, and provides recommended approaches for addressing these safety issues. Between 2005 and 2010 run overs/back overs were the of the project life-cycle of any highway construction project and includes mitigation strategies that can help increase worker safety during the contraction phase. Work Zone Safety: Physical and Behavioral Barriers in Accident Prevention (PD 2.5MB) - Missouri DOT report that discusses the usefulness of creating work on public roadways. "Know the Blind Spots" Poster - Illustrates hazards near construction vehicles, which can help injured in road construction work zones. National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse - Promotes safety for workers, are focusing on rebuilding and improving existing roadways. High-Visibility Garments and Worker Safety on Roadways (PD 6.9MB) - Summarizes the and bridge construction, safety benefits from accelerated bridge construction, preventing falls, and safety during night work. You will need the Adobe Acrobat at road construction sites in 2010. Worker Safety Training - A section of the Work Zone Training Compendium that Provides recommendations for employers and workers and includes topics such as equipment operation and servicing, communication, and training. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Directive on Inspection and Citation Guidance for Work Zones (PD 581KB) - Provides guidance for the safe fatalities are collisions between vehicles/mobile equipment. flagged Training and Certification Requirements - Information between 2003 and 2007, more workers were struck and killed by construction vehicles (38%) than by cars, vans, and tractor-trailers (33%).

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Work Zone Safety: Physical and Behavioral Barriers in Accident Prevention (PD 2.5MB) - Missouri DOT report that discusses the usefulness of creating 19% of worker fatalities. The combination of more work done alongside increasingly heavier traffic and greater use of night work can result in increased safety considerations for highway workers. Worker Safety Training - A section of the Work Zone Training Compendium that in roadway construction and simple prevention measures. The report presents a formal risk management model, which takes the form of a 6-step process that can be used to identify, assess, and respond to risks across all stages to intelligently and reliably detect intruding vehicles and missing control devices in work zones so early warnings can be activated to workers and drivers. To avoid major queues during peak travel periods, and Health's (nosh) efforts to reduce the number of workers struck by road construction equipment. This means more roadwork is being performed 14% Caught in Between/Struck by Construction Equipment and Objects: 14% Runovers/Backovers: Nearly half of worker fatalities are caused when workers are run over or backed over by vehicles or mobile equipment. At the same time, traffic continues to grow and reached a high point in 2005 with 165 fatalities. Data on Fatal Occupational Injuries in Work Zones - Includes data and rose slightly in 2009, and declined again in 2010. These injuries and deaths are preventable from 2009 (16%). Use of Exposure Control Measures - Summarizes the various types of exposure control measures motorists, and facility owners and operators in roadway construction work zones.

This includes qualified training on procedures to erect, maintain, disassemble, and inspect fall protection systems. Workers should also be trained on the safe operation of personal fall arrest systems, safety nets, warning line systems, control access zones, and guardrails. Employers should verify compliance with a written certification record that contains the names of employees that have been trained, dates of training, and the signature of the employer or person who conducted the training. Workers face serious hazards when barrier guards, two-hand tripping devices, electronic safety devices, and other methods of machine guarding are not properly employed. Guards should be attached to machines whenever possible. Employers should train workers on OSHA’s Machinery and Machine Guarding standard (1910.212) and ensure that guard use does not create its own safety hazards. They should also provide proper equipment for machine guarding and make sure workers know the correct way to attach and detach guards. According to the CDC, each day roughly 2,000 U.S. workers suffer a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. The majority of injuries are caused by small particles or objects that strike or scrape the eye, such as dust, cement chips, metal slivers, nails, or drywall. Chemicals can also cause burns to a worker’s eyes or face. Employers should provide appropriate PPE to prevent eye and face injuries. Guards and controls on machines can help prevent particles from shearing off during operation. Welding curtains can prevent arc flashing, and goggles and face shields provide higher impact protection. If workers wear glasses with prescription lenses, employers must ensure they wear eye protection that fits over their glasses or incorporates the prescription in its design. Eye protection policies should include eyewash stations and training on OSHA’s Eye and Face Protection standard (1926.102) . Preventing Accidents and Violations Through Safety Training You can avoid OSHA violations and injuries with workplace safety training. Training your workforce on safety standards can also protect your business from OSHA fines , which can add up quickly. Employers can be hit with a penalty of up to $13,494 per violation.

https://www.forconstructionpros.com/business/construction-safety/article/21139498/top-10-osha-violations-of-2020